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Brennand Museum is a cultural institution located in the city of Recife, Brazil. It is a not-for-profit private organization, inaugurated in 2002 by the Brazilian collector and businessman Ricardo Brennand.

Ricardo Brennand Institute  is a cultural institution located in the city of Recife, Brazil. It is a not-for-profit private organization, inaugurated in 2002 by the Brazilian collector and businessman Ricardo Brennand.

Casa Grande Museum and Freyre preserved décor and collections of sociologist It is in front of a square surrounded by trees and old houses in the quiet neighborhood Apipucos, in Recife, which begins the journey into the universe of the sociologist and writer Gilberto Freyre (1900-1987).

Gilberto Freyre Foundation this farmhouse from the 18th century was Gilberto Freyre’s old residence. Artworks, arts and crafts, book collections and objects that belonged to the Pernambucan writer and sociologist are displayed here.

Recife City Museum Set up in a room in Cinco Pontas Fort, it houses pictures, reproductions of old paintings  and objects that describe Recife since the period of Dutch rule, such as over than one thousand antique photos, tableware, Portuguese and French tiles, among other pieces.

Old Recife’s attractive Plaza on the waterfront is called Marco Zero, or Ground Zero, because during the colonial era it was from this spot that distances were measured to the rest of the state of Pernambuco.

Sinagoga Kahal Zur Israel in Recife , the historic Recife synagogue in Recife Antigo, is the oldest in the Americas, dating to 1646. The original synagogue was destroyed, but a new one was built on site. In the early 21st century, it was restored for use as a museum. It is an important part of Pernambuco’s historic patrimony. It was founded by Jews who settled in the Netherlands after expulsion from Spain and Portugal.

Historic Centre of the Town of Olinda in Recife founded in the 16th century by the Portuguese, the town’s history is linked to the sugar-cane industry. Rebuilt after being looted by the Dutch, its basic urban fabric dates from the 18th century. The harmonious balance between the buildings, gardens, 20 Baroque churches, convents and numerous small passos (chapels) all contribute to Olinda’s particular charm.